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      [Next]
  • WHITE: John Coffey Expert
  • BLACK: Robert Amour Class D
  • Where: Purdue University Chess
  • Tournament 1991
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      [Next]
  • Robert and I were friends at the
  • Purdue Chess Club.  Our ratings
  • could not have been more mismatched,
  • but Robert gives the game a good
  • fight.
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      [Next]
  • More king pawn openings.
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      [Next]
  • Defends the pawn.
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      [Next]
  • The Italian Game.
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      [Next]
  • The most popular opening of the 19th
  • century was to play the Evens Gambit
  • with b4!? now.
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      [Next]
  • The Guico Pianno
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      [Next]
  • Attack the pawn that can not be
  • defended by Nc3.
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      [Next]
  • Force Black to capture.
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      [Next]
  • Captures.
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      [Next]
  • Recaptures.
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      [Next]
  • Everything is book so far.
  •  Sometimes White plays a gambit
  • with 7. Nc3, but BCO2 prefers the
  • following move.
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      [Next]
  • If now Black plays Nxe4, White will
  • get advantage with 8. Bxb4 Nxb4
  • 9. Bxf7+! Kxf7 10. Qb3+ d5 11. Ne5+
  • Ke6 12. Qxb4 and Black has not
  • only
  • lost the extra pawn but the right to
  • castle too.
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      [Next]
  • Check.
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      [Next]
  • Now Black can get an equal game after
  • playing d5!, as that gives Black more
  • room and forces White to get an
  • isolated center pawn.
15








      [Next]
  • Everything was book until Black makes
  • this error which leaves him cramped.
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      [Next]
  • This is the move I felt was critical
  • here.  Although it costs a tempo,
  • it gives the Black c8 Bishop no where
  • to move, and as a result makes it
  • much harder for Black to free his
  • game.
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      [Next]
  • It is questionable for Black to put
  • his Queen on the e-file as that file
  • could easily be opened, and the Queen
  • could then be attacked by a Rook.
  •  But it is hard to see how Black
  • can develope his pieces any other
  • way.
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      [Next]
  • White has a plan of bringing his Rook
  • to the e-file and pushing the pawn to
  • e5 so as to attack the Queen....
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      [Next]
  • Black castles.  He is still
  • cramped and doesn't have a good place
  • to put the c8 bishop.
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      [Next]
  • Part of the White plan.
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      [Next]
  • Black proves that he is a Class D
  • player by making a simple tactical
  • error.
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      [Next]
  • Forking two pieces.
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      [Next]
  • Black figures that if he must give up
  • a piece, then it should be the
  • Knight.  I am not sure that it
  • matters, as he is now lost either
  • way.
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      [Next]
  • Wins the knight.
25








      [Next]
  • Just because White has won material
  • doesn't mean he should give up on his
  • plans that he made earlier.....
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      [Next]
  • ... pushing e5 hoping to open the e
  • file and put pressure on the queen.
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      [Next]
  • The Knight can be too easily attacked
  • on this square, as White is ahead in
  • development, material, and space.
  •  But moving the Knight to d7
  • loses material after e6!, so the only
  • safe square is to undevelope the
  • Knight to e8.
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      [Next]
  • This is not a good move as Black CAN
  • DEAL WITH IT EASILY.  Instead
  • Nd2-e4 would have increased the
  • attack on d5 while threatening to win
  • a pawn on d6.
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      [Next]
  • Black should have played Nb6 which
  • brings his Knight to safety and makes
  • the Queen on b3 look misplaced since
  • then if Rd1?? Ba4!
  • Instead, WALKING INTO A PIN is almost
  • always a terrible idea.
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      [Next]
  • This is very forcing, but Nd4 might
  • also be interesting.
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      [Next]
  • Not much choice as the queen was
  • attacked.
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      [Next]
  • The knight actually wants to go to c3
  • to put pressure on d5.
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      [Next]
  • The queen has to continue to guard
  • the d5 knight.
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      [Next]
  • Adding pressure to d5.  Now maybe
  • Ba4 would reduce Blacks additional
  • material loss down to a pawn, but at
  • the cost of trading several pieces.
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      [Next]
  • He defends the knight.
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      [Next]
  • White puts yet another attacker on
  • the Knight.
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      [Next]
  • The knight is lost so Black makes
  • desperation moves.
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      [Next]
  • Wins the knight.
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      [Next]
  • Now the easy way for White to win a
  • pawn is with Bxc6, but I chose a
  • prettier finish.  White can also
  • win material with 21. Ne5 or 21.
  • Be4!, but I prefer the moves below as
  • it brings the game to a quick
  • conclusion.
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      [Next]
  • Check.  Because the queen is
  • attacked as well Black must play ...
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      [Next]
  • ... Qxf7.
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      [Next]
  • Exchanging queens.  No good now
  • is Rxf7 because d8 will drop, so ...
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      [Next]
  • He must take with the king.
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      [Next]
  • Trading rooks.
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      [Next]
  • All of Black's responses have been
  • forced.
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      [Next]
  • With this fork White gets his
  • sacrificed piece back.  Soon
  • pawns on the queenside will start
  • dropping.  Here Black throws in
  • the towel.
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